The Queen is dead. Long live the King!

We wear black as a sign of mourning

 

BBC presenters are required by dress code to wear a black shirt, black tie and black suit when a member of the Royal Family dies. Wearing black as a sign of mourning.

For more than 500 years in Europe and the Americas, black was a sign of mourning. It was worn at funerals and for a time after the death of a loved one. It was initially the custom of royalty and the aristocracy. When they experienced grief they wore mourning clothes. In the Middle Ages, the rich wore black velvet. Especially widows wore mourning dresses in the Middle Ages. In the 18th century, a new class emerges, the merchant class, for whom expensive cloth becomes affordable. The wealthy European merchant class wanted to copy the aristocracy in both dress and fashion. This included mourning dress.

 

In the Middle Ages, the rich wore black velvet. Especially widows wore a mourning dress in the Middle Ages. In the 18th century, a new class emerged, the merchant class, for whom expensive cloth becomes affordable. The wealthy European merchant class wanted to copy the aristocracy in both dress and fashion. This included mourning dress.

 

The BFC proposes to reschedule the London Fashion Week shows on the day of the Queen’s funeral.

Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, Charles III is sworn in and then tours the country, including Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The funeral will most likely take place 10 days after his death. Queen Elizabeth will be buried next to her husband Prince Philip at Windsor Castle.

The Queen was crowned in June 1953 after a year and a half’s wait. After the coronation, Charles’s wife will become Queen Camilla. The two of them will continue their lives as leaders of the Commonwealth and defenders of the faith, as British monarchs have done.

 

Sebastiandoe5, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

 

The Queen is dead. Long live the King!
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